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3 edition of Reducing fire potential in lodgepole pine by increasing timber utilization found in the catalog.

Reducing fire potential in lodgepole pine by increasing timber utilization

Brown, James K.

Reducing fire potential in lodgepole pine by increasing timber utilization

by Brown, James K.

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest & Range Experiment Station in Ogden, Utah .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forest fires -- Prevention and control,
  • Lodgepole pine

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJames K. Brown.
    SeriesUSDA Forest Service research note INT -- 181., Research note INT -- 181.
    ContributionsIntermountain Research Station (Ogden, Utah)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17618099M
    OCLC/WorldCa32099784

    Other Classifications--Lodgepole Pine habitats form an easily distinguishable subdivision of the mixed conifer forest. Other classifications are Lodgepole Pine (U.S. Forest Service ) and Lodgepole Forest (Munz and Keck ). Classifications based on potential vegetation may not include a lodgepole pine type, considering it successional. Pricing/Availability: Lodgepole Pine should be widely available as construction lumber for a modest price. Some Lodgepole Pine is mixed with Ponderosa Pine and sold together as construction lumber under the stamp “PP/LP”. It is also mixed with various species of spruce, pine, and fir and sold under the group abbreviation “SPF.”.

    Structural properties of lodgepole pine timber (Bulletin / University of Colorado, Engineering Experiment Station) [Robert E Rathburn] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Robert E Rathburn. NEMBERDECEMBER L. 89 N 6 TE FRESTR CRNCLE AbstrAct Concerns about the impacts of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins)-caused tree mortality on wildfire potential in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia Engelm.) forests have to date largely focused on the potential for extreme fire behaviour, including the development and spread of crown fires.

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) Lodgepole pine is a species which grows throughout the west, as far north as the Yukon and south to Baja California. It ranges east to the Black Hills of South Dakota and west all the way to the Pacific Ocean. The Folly of "Salvage" Logging Here is a good article in the Los Angeles Times (7/18/18) that discusses the folly of pretending that we know better than Nature when the US Forest Service and timber companies promote the practice of post fire "salvage" logging, in this case the fragile post-fire habitat created by the Rim Fire on the Stanislaus National Forest.


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Reducing fire potential in lodgepole pine by increasing timber utilization by Brown, James K. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fire hazard on the near complete units after logging was minimal and prescribed burning was impractical. Citation: Brown, James K. Reducing fire potential in lodgepole pine by increasing timber utilization. Research Note INT Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station.

6 by: 5. Reducing fire potential in lodgepole pine by increasing timber utilization Author: James K Brown ; Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah).

Fuel and fire potential in clearcut lodgepole pine were compared after stands were logged to near complete and conventional utilization standards. After logging, material greater than 3 inches in diameter had been reduced threefold on the near complete units and had been increased threefold on the conventional units.

FIRE RESTORATION OPTIONS IN LODGEPOLE PINE ECOSYSTEMS G. Thomas Zimmerman u.s. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, National Interagency Fire Center, Development Avenue, Boise, lD Philip N.

Omi Department of Forest Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Simulated fire behaviour in young, postfire lodgepole pine forests Kellen N. NelsonA,B,E, Monica G. TurnerC, William H. RommeD and Daniel B. TinkerA AProgram in Ecology and Department of Botany, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WYUSA.

BDivision of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Reno, NVUSA. CDepartment of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI. Our data suggest that 76% of the young post-fire lodgepole pine forests have hr fuel loads that exceed levels associated with high-severity surface fire potential, and 63% exceed levels.

Ponderosa pine crown structure, branching pattern, and needle and bud characteristics also affect survival during fire. The open crown structure and branching pattern of ponderosa pine allows for better mixing of air and dissipation of heat within stands during a fire, thus reducing the potential Cited by: A mountain pine beetle outbreak in Colorado lodgepole pine forests has altered stand and fuel characteristics that affect potential fire behavior.

cm in immature cut blocks on the coast and cm for Lodgepole pine in the interior. Minimum log top diameter (inside bark), Coast and Interior: cm, except cm for mature cut blocks on the changing log top size utilization from a cm top to a cm top may reduce the net volume by 5%.

The All Fire % - This is the. Climate change and fire ecology Projected changes in climate and fire regimes. The future climate of the Pacific Northwest is projected to be substantially warmer than the present based on an analysis of climate simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (Mote and Salathe, ).This assessment encompassed the states of Washington Cited by: of warp in lodgepole pine studs to sawing methods, to log cross-sectional eccentricity, to position of the stud in the log, to log diameter, to log position in the tree, and to presence of compression wood.

An additional subject is the effect on warp of long-term storage of strapped packages of lodgepole pine. For millennia the forests of the Rocky Mountains in the western United States have been shaped by wildfires (Romme and Despain,Sibold et al., ), outbreaks of insects (Eisenhart and Veblen,Jarvis and Kulakowski, ), and the potential interactions between these disturbances (Veblen et al., ) ().The subalpine forests in this region are dominated by lodgepole pine (Pinus Cited by: 6.

The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a significant pest of lodgepole pine in British Columbia (BC), where it has recently reached an unprecedented outbreak level.

Although it is native to western North America, the beetle can now be viewed as a native invasive because for the first time in recorded history it has begun to reproduce in native jack pine stands within the North.

Silvicultural strategies to reduce tree losses from mountain pine beetle attacks typically seek to reduce relative densities in order to increase tree resistance and thus lower potential beetle attacks.

For lodgepole pine stands, however, the tree mortality/relative density relationship is nonlinear. We describe three relative density zones corresponding to different levels of resistance to Cited by: Fuel Reduction Treatments in Western States Summary In the 15 western states there are at least 28 million acres of forest that could benefit from some type of mechanical treatment to reduce hazardous fuel loading.

It is estimated that about 60 percent of this area could be operationally accessible for treatment with a totalCited by: As climate change is increasing the frequency, severity and extent of wildfire and bark beetle outbreaks, it is important to understand how these disturbances interact to affect ecological patterns and processes, including susceptibility to subsequent disturbances.

Stand-replacing fires and outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae, are both important disturbances in the Cited by: developed by Gholz and others () for lodgepole pine: LogeW = Log•dbh() - where W equals weight of bole in kg and dbh is diameter in cm. Growth is determined by establishing the stem weight last year and subtracting it from current stem weight.

Thus, to. greatest volume of lodgepole pine saw-timber and is followed, in decreasing order of volume, by Colorado, Wyo-ming, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, California, Washington, Alaska, and Nevada.

Production The production of lodgepole pine lumber and round products has in-creased steadily since after a half century of relatively little use (fig. 3).File Size: KB.

Lodgepole pine is one of the tree species that may need fire to open itscones to release seeds. Fire also leaves cleared beds of ash where new trees can sprout and grow.

In fact, without thinning, lodgepole stands can turn into thickets that soon stagnate growth, which can greatly increase the chance of catastrophic fire and epidemic insect. Fire and Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreaks in Lodgepole Pine Forests. Although outbreaks of mountain pine beetle do alter fuel structure (Page and Jenkins ; Klutsch et al.

; Simard et al. ), the actual effects of these changes in fuels on subsequent fire risk (i.e., the chance that a fire might start based on all causative agents such as fuel hazard, ignition source, and weather) Cited by:.

The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a significant pest of lodgepole pine in British Columbia (BC), where it has recently reached an unprecedented outbreak gh it is native to western North America, the beetle can now be viewed as a native invasive because for the first time in recorded history it has begun to reproduce in native jack pine stands within the North Cited by: Caring for the land and serving people.

United States Department of Agriculture. Southern Research Station. Johnny Grace, III, Research Engineer Managing benefits and fire hazard in the recovering forest. Brown, James K.; Smith, Jane Kapler. Reducing fire potential in lodgepole pine by increasing timber utilization.The lodgepole pine stands in this area are nearly pure except for scattered red fir (Abies magnifica), western white pine (Pinus monticola) and mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana).

The percentages of these other species increase along the edges of the basin. Approximately 4, acres of pure lodgepole pine and lodgepole pine - mixed conifers.